ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT
SPRING MEETING

The Institute for American Indian Studies
38 Curtis Road
Washington, CT
Saturday, April 30, 2005

The Archaeology and Ethnography of Western Connecticut

Note: Parking is limited – Please carpool if at all possible

9:00–9:30 REGISTRATION - COFFEE
Registration fee will be $10, or $8 for ASC or IAIS members, or $5 for students with ID’s, which includes admission to the museum.

SPECIAL MEMBERSHIP OFFER – TODAY ONLY:  Attendees who join both the ASC and IAIS can do so for a total of $55, which is a $5 discount for each membership, plus a free book from each organization.  Those who are already ASC members can join IAIS for $35, and receive a free book (choice of 3) plus 10% off in the museum shop.  Those who are already IAIS members can join ASC for $20, plus one free back issue of the Bulletin (except #62).
 

9:30-10:00 THE WEANTINOCKS ON THE NEW ENGLAND FRONTIER
Dr. Laurie Weinstein, Western Connecticut State University

ABSTRACT:  This short presentation describes my ethnohistorical investigations of the Weantinock Indians of western Connecticut.  I draw upon a variety of primary and secondary records to place this little known group in time and space. The talk will be illustrated with maps and photos from the WCSU's field schools at Lover's Leap.

SPEAKER: Laurie Weinstein is an anthropologist at Western Connecticut State University and when she is not teaching and writing, she is home taking care of her 8 pets.
 

10:00-10:30 LITHIC TECHNOLOGY ON THE SOUTHEASTERN NEW YORK/SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT BORDER
Lynn-Marie Wieland

ABSTRACT:  From at least 6000 BC to 1700 AD, Native Americans lived along the southeastern New York/-southwestern Connecticut border.  They found abundant food resources and lots of quartz.  Quartz from pegmatite ridges located on the sites, quartz from quarries a short distance away and quartz cobbles just waited to be picked up and used, and use it they did.  There was a formal tool industry.  There were prepared cores and utilized flakes struck from these cores, and there was a bipolar industry.  The quartz was used in a variety of ways and its use depended upon its quality, color, and how distant the source was from the site.  Although chert was prevalent on these sites, it was an exotic material, and was used differently than the quartz.  The lithic technology runs like a connecting thread through these border sites.

SPEAKER:  After a two-year hiatus, Lynn-Marie has finished her thesis and will receive her MA from Hunter College, CUNY, in June.  She is currently researching the use of lithic materials on Native American sites along the southeastern New York/southwestern Connecticut border.
 

10:30-11:00 TRANSFORMATION OF AN INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPE
 Dr. Robert Gordon, Yale University

ABSTRACT:  For nearly two hundred years residents of northwest Connecticut devoted their mineral, forest, and water resources to producing iron in a nationally important industry.  Yet they were able to gradually transform their land to new, sustainable uses that leave few traces of past industry.  Material and documentary evidence helps us discover how they effected this transformation.

SPEAKER:  Robert Gordon is with the Department of Geology and Geophysics and the Council on Archaeological Studies at Yale.  He is the author of three books dealing with northwest Connecticut, Connecticut's Ames Ironworks, Family, Community, Nature, and Innovation in an Enterprise of the Early American Republic, 1998 (with Gregory Galer and Francis Kemmish); Industrial Heritage in Northwest Connecticut, a Guide to History and Archaeology, 2000 (with Michael Raber); and A Landscape Transformed, the Ironmaking District of Salisbury, Connecticut.
 

11:00-4:00 Demonstration running concurrently with presentations of papers, location to be announced

STONE TOOL TECHNOLOGIES OF WESTERN CONNECTICUT
Jeffrey Kalin, Primitive Technologies Inc.

Jeff will be giving a demonstration on stone tool manufacture and use.  His demonstration will address function and importance of various types of stone tools found in the area now known as "Western Connecticut".  He will available to answer questions on all aspects of prehistoric lithic tool production.

Jeffrey Kalin is a graduate of Norwalk Community College's Archaeology as an Avocation Program.  He is the founding director of Primitive Technologies, Inc. and his company recreates the material culture of prehistoric Native American life. Jeff has over 25 years experience in his field and is a consultant to museum curators and archaeologists in the analysis of artifacts and experimental archaeological projects.  He is a recognized expert in Clovis point replication and other types of stone tools.  Jeff has constructed over two hundred prehistoric buildings and burnt many logs into dugout canoes.  His wood-fired replica pottery, hand built from river clay, is in private and public collections.  Skilled in all aspects of Native American indigenous arts, Jeff has taught those skills to others, including hands-on workshops for all ages of children and adults.
 

11:00-11:30 FROM ONE SIDE TO THE OTHER: HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY ALONG THE
NORWALK RIVER
Professor Ernest Wiegand, Norwalk Community College

ABSTRACT:  Historical Archaeology along the Norwalk River in the heart of downtown Norwalk has been conducted by students from Norwalk Community College on several occasions, beginning with the testing of the Norwalk (Smith) Pottery in the late 1970s.  As the city grows, both historic residences and industrial sites are threatened with destruction.  Recent excavations at the Rogers-Ritch-Merritt House and building documentation of the now-demolished Norwalk Pottery site were both requested of Norwalk Community College's archaeology program by Norwalk historic preservationists.  Both projects have assisted in advancing knowledge of the town's history, which is rapidly being lost to development.  This paper will summarize the progress of each of these "salvage" projects.

SPEAKER:  Ernest A. Wiegand is a professor of Anthropology and Sociology at Norwalk Community College and Director of the college’s Archaeology as an Avocation Certificate Program, now in its 28th year of service to the community.  He is also a consultant directing cultural resource management studies through out southwestern Connecticut and southeastern New York.
 
 

11:30-12:00 A HISTORIC AND PREHISTORIC EXPLORATION OF MILFORD'S COAST, MARSHES,
AND ESTUARIES
Michael Bouchard

ABSTRACT:  The lecture will discuss both the historic and prehistoric aspects of both the Baldwin's Station (CT84-25) and the Laurel Beach (CT84-73) sites that are located along the Housatonic River and its estuary into Long Island Sound in the town of Milford, Connecticut.  Included will be an interpretation of life along the estuary and its impact on the environment.  Such topics as cultural affiliations, environmental changes both terrestrial and aquatic, historic research, prehistoric research, and report structuring will be discussed.
 
SPEAKER:  Michael Bouchard has been an avocational archaeologist for twenty-six years.  He is one of two authors who has ever published a monographed site report (The Baldwin's Station Site and its Environs) in the state of Connecticut, the first being Roger Moeller report on 6LF21.  Bouchard will be publishing the state’s third monographed site report in the fall of 2005, The Archaeology and Ecology of the Laurel Beach Encampment. Bouchard’s work can be found at www.siftings.com.
 

12:00-1:30 LUNCH (See flyer for options)
 

1:30-2:00 BUSINESS MEETING
 

2:00-2:30 SCHAGHTICOKE: THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND DOCUMENTARY EVIDENCE OF A
THRIVING INDIAN COMMUNITY IN NORTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT
Dr. Lucianne Lavin, Institute for American Indian Studies

ABSTRACT: Since their formal recognition as a Native American tribe by the federal government, the Schaghticoke have received a goodly amount of media coverage.  Much of it is due to the fact that the Tribe had announced plans to build a casino in western Connecticut.  The announcement has created fierce opposition to the Tribe's federal recognition and the recognition process in general.  An unfortunate outcome of these hostilities is the false accusation that the Schaghticoke are not a tribe and do not deserve recognition.  This paper will discuss some of the major archaeological and documentary evidence that prove the Schaghticoke are and have been a thriving Native American community since the beginning of sustained Euro-American contact in northwestern Connecticut to the present.

SPEAKER:  Lucianne Lavin is an anthropological archaeologist who has been researching Northeastern Native American peoples for the past 25 years.  She has written over 125 publications and technical reports on the subject.  She received her BA in anthropology from Indiana University and her MA and Ph.D. in anthropology from New York University.  She is currently the Director of Research and Collections at the Institute for American Indian Studies in Washington, CT, a Fellow of the New York State Archaeological Association, member of the New York State Archaeological Council and the Connecticut Native American Heritage Advisory council, and editor of the journal of the Archaeological Society of Connecticut.
 

2:30-3:00 THE PREHISTORIC INTERPRETATION OF PUTNAM PARK: A PLACE TO CAMP
Robert M. Dean, John O’Neil Davidson and Kathleen von Jena

ABSTRACT:  Putnam Park was founded in 1887 to commemorate the winter encampment of Revolutionary War soldiers that occurred in Redding Connecticut in 1778-79.  Over the years there have been several archaeological investigations and the Park has since been designated as one of Connecticut’s Archaeological Preserves.  Although the primary focus of these excavations has been on the historic military component, each excavation has encountered one or more prehistoric components.  This paper is an attempt to address the prehistoric occupations of Putnam Park and to explore how they relate to the surrounding area of Redding and also how they may be used to provide a broader interpretation for the visiting public at the Park.

SPEAKERS:  Formerly a student of Daniel J. Cruson at Joel Barlow High School, Robert M. Dean is currently attending his last semester at Hunter College in New York, where he is enrolled in the Anthropology BA program.  He has also, since 2001, been working for Ernest Wiegand, participating in archaeological surveys in Fairfield and Westchester counties.  Upon finishing his BA, Robert hopes to attend graduate school, where he plans to study the prehistoric archaeology of the cultures of the Arctic and Subarctic.

John O'Neil Davidson started his archaeological career in the fall of 1999 excavating the Officer’s Quarters under Daniel J. Cruson.  Since then, he has gone on to receive a BA from The George Washington University under Eric H. Cline, Ph.D.  John has been involved in countless excavations, including cultural resource management projects with Ernest Wiegand, and an academic field school at an Archaic Period site in south central Oregon through the University of Oregon.  Since receiving his Bachelor’s degree in May 2004, John has been working under David Hurst Thomas, Ph.D. at the American Museum of Natural History.  Currently, John is assisting with the production of David Hurst Thomas’ next monograph, and the ongoing survey project of all the sites on St. Catherine’s Island in Georgia.

Kathleen von Jena graduated from the Norwalk Community College Archaeology Certification Program and is working towards her BA.  She has been co-director of the Joel Barlow High School archaeological field school at Putnam Memorial State Park from 1998 through 2004.  She is currently serving as an archaeological adviser to the Redding Planning Commission and as a Municipal Historian to the Town of Redding.
 

3:00-3:30 AFRO-AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY IN NEWTOWN AT THE FREEDOM-DAVIS SITE
Daniel J. Cruson, Archaeological Society of Connecticut

ABSTRACT:  This site is in the backyard of a house build by a former slave.  Cato Freedom received his freedom in 1783 and in that same year bought an acre of real estate from his former owner and immediately built a house on it.  In 1799, he purchased a contiguous one-acre lot on the hill behind his house and built a house on that lot for his son, Osias.  Both of these houses are still in existence, after having been lived in by three generations of African Americans.  Both the features of the main house and the artifacts being recovered in the yard exhibit some distinctively different aspects than are found in a European house of the same period.  After giving some background on the house and family, a brief account of the excavations of a probable cooperage and the discoveries of spirit marks and a concealment shoe will be discussed which shed new light on the Afro-American spiritual practices of the late 18th century.

SPEAKER:  Dan Cruson has been teaching archaeology at Joel Barlow High School for over 30 years, is the Town Historian for Newtown, CT, and is the president of the Archaeological Society of Connecticut.
 

3:30-4:00 KNAPPING IN WESTPORT: 9,000 YEARS AT COMPO ON THE WESTERN CONNECTICUT
COAST
Vance Tiede

ABSTRACT:  During the late 19th century, the Bradley-Punzelt family collected several hundred lithics from their onion farm at Compo, Westport, Connecticut.  Although the artifacts were collected from the surface and plow zone, their great number and wide variety of styles yield interesting data about the evolution of stone tools on western Connecticut's coast during the Archaic and Woodland periods.

SPEAKER:  Vance Tiede received his BA in History at Johns Hopkins and his MA in Archaeological Studies from Yale University.  He is a member of the Archaeological Society of Connecticut, Norwalk Community College Archaeology Club and the Historical Astronomy Division/American Astronomical Society.  Vance is currently a teacher with the Easton-Redding Public Schools system.  His research interests include Archaeoastronomy and digital photogrammetry.
 

4:30-5:00 RECEPTION
 

 

DIRECTIONS TO THE SPRING MEETING

From Western CT: I- 84 East to Exit 15.  Route 67 (left turn) towards Roxbury and Route 199.  Right onto Route 199 after passing Roxbury Post Office, go 3 miles and turn left onto Curtis Road.

Alternate from the West:  Northern CT: Route 7 to New Milford to Route 67 towards Roxbury.  Turn left onto Route 199, go 3 miles and turn left onto Curtis Road.

From Eastern CT: I-84 West to Exit 15.  Route 67 (left turn) towards Roxbury and Route 199.  Right onto Route 199 after passing Roxbury Post Office.  Go 3 miles and turn left onto Curtis Road.

Alternate from Hartford, CT: Route 202 from Hartford.  Route 47 to Washington Green to Route 199.  Take Route 199 south turn right onto Curtis Road.

Note: Parking is limited – Please carpool if at all possible
 

Return to ASC Page

Return to Siftings Home Page